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Yesterday I visited Gloucestershire Archives to have a look at their GAIP (Gloucestershire Archives Ingest Package) software.

GAIP is a little Perl app which is open source and nicely platform independent (yesterday we saw it in action on both XP and Fedora). Using GAIP, you can take a digital file, or a collection of files, and create a non-proprietary preservation version of it, which is then kept in a .tgz file containing the preservation version, the original, the metadata, and a log of alterations. Currently it works with image files, so that GAIP can create a .tgz containing the original bmp (for instance) as well as the png which it has created. GAIP can then also create a publication version of the image, usually a JPEG. Gloucestershire Archives are intending to expand GAIP to cover other sorts of files too: it depends on what sorts of converters they can track down.

At present GAIP uses a command line interface which isn’t terribly friendly, but this can easily be improved.

From my point of view, I was glad to have a play with GAIP as it has rekindled my optimism about low-level digital preservation. I have been in a sulk for a couple of months because the only likely solutions seemed to be big-budget applications set up by (and therefore controlled by) national-level organisations. GAIP however is a ray of local light, a sign that UK local authorities might be able to develop in-house and low budget solutions which are realistic to our own specific contexts.

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